Ease on Down the Road

Updated insider information by Chellie Campbell, author of “The Wealthy Spirit: Daily Affirmations for Financial Stress Reduction”

280-October 7

“Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.”—Leo Buscaglia

The traffic on the roads in major cities can be a considerable cause of stress. Most people have heard of “road rage”—when tempers flare so badly that people do crazy things as anger overcomes normal sensibilities. When the flow of cars stops and it seems as if you’re in a parking lot instead of on a freeway, it is frustrating and you are helpless. You can’t get where you want to go. The anger you feel gets compounded when you see other people make stupid driving mistakes: They pull into your lane without looking, making you slam on the brakes to avoid hitting them, or they tail-gate and make you afraid they’re going to run into you.

Years ago, a boyfriend developed a new attitude for driving the busy streets of Los Angeles. He had gotten into the habit of fuming over the traffic and this put him in a negative frame of mind each time he got into his car. A self-aware thinker, he noticed that the problem was his own and that he was the one suffering because of it. It was not healthy or productive for him to be constantly angry about a fact of life that he couldn’t control. Accepting that he couldn’t change the traffic situation in Los Angeles, he realized that what he could change was his reaction to it.

It was up to him to project a peaceful and loving attitude toward driving. Instead of being solely concerned with himself and what he wanted, he chose to approach the situation from a desire to help others. He decided that he was in charge of his section of the road. It was his job to see that everyone on his section got down the road safely. This put him in a positive, helpful frame of mind. When someone wanted to change lanes, he slowed down and waved them over with a smile. When someone tailgated him, he moved over so they could pass him. He did everything in his power to make sure that other drivers had a pleasant driving experience while around him. If somebody did something stupid, he would just shrug and say, “Oh, well. I’ve made that mistake, too.”

This new focus of helping others on the road transformed his driving experience to one of happiness and helpfulness instead of anger and frustration. Imagine if everyone approached traffic with this attitude! Try this out for yourself today. You will find that when you get where you’re going, you will arrive with a peaceful and loving frame of mind. You will feel better about others and better about yourself. Instead of “road rage,” you’ll have “street peace.”

Today’s Affirmation: “I help everyone around me to joyfully ease on down the road.”

Blue Ridge mountains South Carolina

Blue Ridge mountains South Carolina

Trade show and marketing guru Ruth Faller contributed our blog article for today – she delivers some great tips on how to keep your marketing fresh!

Is It Getting Old?

Off to the show again—your tenth show this year promoting your newest product. It’s the same product you’ve been talking about every hour of every show for the last few months. After a while you may feel like a robot, repeating the same words with the same tone of voice, over and over. Teachers, trainers and actors have this problem too. How do you make what you have to repeat consistently interesting and engaging?

I will be speaking at EXHIBITOR to CTSM candidates, event planners and exhibitors on the topic of Selling without Spewing, a topic I have spoken and written on before. As a first-timer at this conference I was required to attend a speaker’s workshop. Our instructor Dan Lumpkin said something that will stick in my mind. When he walks out in front of his audience he tells himself that he is presenting a wonderful gift that he knows they will enjoy. His presentations reflect his positive attitude. He has such a following that some people will take any class he teaches just to be in the room with him.

Let’s go back to talking about your new product in your booth. Do you present your pitch the same way each time, with each feature and benefit in the same order? Something as simple as changing the order of the ideas can force you to present it in a more genuine way.

Learn something about your prospect before you begin your sales talk. Begin with the one thing it appears they (not you) would feel is most beneficial about your product or service.

Watch for body language and ask questions while speaking. Make sure they grasp what you are saying. Watch for social cues. Are they shifting from one leg to the other? Are their eyes glazing over? Or are they attentively looking at you and interjecting in the conversation? By allowing them to ask questions you will create interaction and avoid that robotic feeling.

When getting ready to present something for the umpteenth time it is easy to fall into negative thoughts, dreading the repetition. Keep your thoughts positive. Experts agree that constant negative thoughts affect the way you speak and your body language. Positive affirmations can help. Try: “I provide fresh beneficial information to prospects and customers.”

Visit the blog: www.RuthInTheBooth.com to see affirmations that will help you keep your presentations fresh.

Marketing and trade show strategist Ruth Failer teaches exhibitors how to increase sales from trade shows and retain customers long after the event is over. For more information go to BestTipsOfTheTrade.com or RuthInTheBooth.com.