Feng Shui and Fountains

Updated insider information by Chellie Campbell, author of “The Wealthy Spirit: Daily Affirmations for Financial Stress Reduction”

254-September 11

“The most powerful emotion we can experience is the mystical. It is the power of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead.”—Albert Einstein

Pat McKee is a rock hound. She loves her rocks. She knows the mystical properties in every stone, every crystal, and generously shares her information. Under a tree-shaded patio in San Dimas, California, Pat teaches people to build feng shui fountains to put in their homes. Feng shui is the ancient Chinese art of object placement, which can affect the harmony of your life positively or negatively. Pat helps each workshop participant to create a fountain with rocks that promote health, wealth, loving relationships or any other particular quality they desire.

Some people swear feng shui works, and that rocks and crystals can promote certain energies. Other people think it’s New Age hogwash. I’m for anything that works, so I took Pat’s class and built a fountain. I decided to believe that this would work for me, and I would be richer from doing it. I rearranged things in my house to be better aligned in the feng shui mode, and put wonderful wealth-enhancing stones in my fountain. Here’s what I used:

1. Citrine: Called “The Merchant’s Stone,” it attracts abundance

2. Variscite: Encourages the flow of energy fulfilling the need

3. Tiger Eye: Stimulates wealth and enhances the stability required to maintain wealth

4. Vanadinite: Thrift in spending

5. Diamond: Good amplifier; inspires forces of accumulation. Helps manifest abundance in all areas of life. (I put an old gold ring with diamond chips in the fountain for this one.)

6. Gold: It’s gold!

(Continued on page 254 of The Wealthy Spirit)

Today’s Affirmation: “I use all the knowledge and power available to me to create the life I desire!”

Today is the anniversary of the destruction of the World Trade Center in New York.

I remember that day vividly. My phone rang about 6:00 am and I groggily woke and said, “Hello?”

My friend Lesleigh said, “Oh my God, Chellie, turn on the television.”

“What’s happening?” I asked. “What channel?”

“It doesn’t matter what channel,” she replied. “I’ll talk to you later.”

Anxiously, I turned on the TV and my breath caught as I saw the smoke pouring from the first tower and heard the newscaster saying a plane had flown into it. It was being treated as some terrible accident…that is, until another plane flew into the other tower. And all the world realized together that this wasn’t an accident, it was a planned attack by crazed terrorists…

Such shared experiences forever changes us, bonds us together in new ways. I remembered back to a similar shocking experience the day John F. Kennedy was assassinated when I was a sophomore in high school. His brother, Robert Kennedy, was shot to death at the Ambassador hotel just hours after I had seen him speak in Santa Barbara when I was attending UCSB. Not long after, another dark day came when Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed; and then John Lennon, too. The list is long.

There is a bell-curve of humanity: the saints, heroes, and geniuses are at one end of the scale, and the murderers, tyrants, and fanatics are at the other. Most of us are in that great vast middle called normal human beings. We glory in the best of us, and shudder at the worst.

Today I remember the fallen heroes of 9/11, mourn their loss, and celebrate their lives.